Zambian Telecentres boost the Youth in Development Agenda

As a developing country where the youth aged 25 years and below account for 68% of the country’s estimated 11.7 million people according to Zambia Central Statistics Office, 2006 projections. With a rise in population according to the 2010 Census preliminary results, in which the country’s population recorded to be about 13 million, the youth population is also expected to rise. This bottom heavy demographic presents a major challenge with its far reaching consequences on the productive and social sectors of the country. The main problems that youth in Zambia face include poor information flow on issues affecting their own survival and transition into adulthood, limited participation in national development and decision making, lack of quality and adequate and equal education especially secondary, lack of quality, affordable, and easily accessible training, lifelong learning and skills development opportunities, an absence of youth rights, lack of opportunities for their integration into economic, political and social development. Truly, achieving youth in development, requires the meaningful consideration of a youth perspective. A youth perspective means young people are actors and resources in development cooperation.

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Zambian farmers to use SMsize Internet based platform to improve their productivity.

NAIS zambiaDespite its potential, the agricultural sector in Zambia has performed below expectations.  One of the factors that have been repeatedly mentioned as responsible for this dismal performance has been weak research-extension-farmer linkages. However, this will be a thing of the past as Zambian farmers will soon start using their mobile phones to send questions on the problems they face in carrying out their farming activities and receive answers within shortest time possible.

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Southern Africa Telecentre Network endorses new regional telecentre leaders

The regional telecentre planning workshop for southern African countries that was held in June 2010 had a strategic agenda to usher in telecentre network  leaders. In its quest to have a strong regional knowledge sharing platform, Southern African Telecentre Network discussed among other issues the need to have a leadership team to help the regional network achieve its objectives and work-plan as outlined in its Strategic plan for the period 2011 to 2013. Satnet_workshopThe regional workshop comprised of participants from network leaders from 8 telecentre networks and telecentre focal points from among countries in southern Africa.

The steering executive comprised of Zambia (Mwika Kapasha, Chairperson), Tanzania (Felician Ncheye, Vice  Chairperson), Malawi (Dereck Lackuzala), Zimbabwe (Rosaline Morota, C/Member), Mozambique (Polly Gaster, C/member), Botswana (Ishmael, C/Member) and Dean Mulozi as Regional Secretary. The position of trustee is yet to be discussed.

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Zambia Telecentre Network

Workshop establishes and endorses a national telecentre network in Zambia

by Dean Mulozi, SATNET, Zambia

inauguration

Zambia, with a growing need for ICT universal access, challenges of power and ICT infrastructure particularly to its rural populace, joins the telecentre community around the world through the formation of a national telecentre network.  Current statistics indicate that only about 30% of the population has access to voice communications and 18,000 to internet services. The national telecentre development workshop was held from 14th to 17th December 2009 and brought in twenty five (25) telecentre practitioners, managers and ICT led organizations from rural and urban Zambia.

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Unemployed Poor Urban and Peri-Urban Youths of Kitwe District, Zambia - Can Agribusiness provide opportunities?

Kitwe District is located in the central part of the Copperbelt. The name Kitwe depicts the skull of an elephant (in vernacular [Bemba] Icitwe chansofu) which was found near the stream alongside some copper ore deposits. Foreign settlers could not pronounce the name “Citwe” as local used to call it and pronounced it as “Kitwe”. The district is the most populated district on the Copperbelt province of Zambia and second most populated in Zambia. In 2000, the district had a total population of 376,124 accounting for about 23.8 percent of the total population of the province. The population was 410,448 in 2002 with an estimated growth rate of 1.1 percent per annum. The demographic trend of Kitwe shows that the population has been increasing at a decreasing rate. This trend is attributed to the rise in HIV/ AIDS parallel diseases such as Tuberculosis and diarrhoea. Additionally, the privatisation of mines and liberation of the economy resulted into massive job losses, causing people to migrate to other districts in search of employment and other economic opportunities.

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